West-Orange Cove Isdfirst Grade Mathematics 2Nd Six Weeks 2012 - 2013

West-Orange Cove ISDFirst Grade Mathematics – 2nd Six Weeks 2012 - 2013

Lesson began on Week 5 1st 6 weeks and continues 1st week of 2nd 6 weeks
October 1 - 5
(2nd 6 weeks )
4 instructional days
+ 1 day for topic assessment / Learning Standards
1.1 The student uses mathematical processes to acquire and demonstrate mathematical understanding.
1.2 The student applies mathematical process standards to represent and compare whole numbers
1.3 The student applies mathematical process standards to develop and use strategies for whole number addition and subtraction computations in order to solve problems.
1.5 The student applies mathematical process standards to identify and apply number patterns within properties of numbers and operations in order to describe relationships / Processes
·  When possible, students will apply mathematics to problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace.
·  Students will use a problem-solving model that incorporates analyzing given information, formulating a plan or strategy, determining a solution, justifying the solution, and evaluating the problem-solving process and the reasonableness of the solution.
·  Students will select appropriate tools such as real objects, manipulatives, algorithms, paper and pencil, and technology and techniques such as mental math, estimation, [and] number sense, and generalization and abstraction to solve problems.
·  Students will effectively communicate mathematical ideas, reasoning, and their implications using multiple representations such as symbols, diagrams, graphs, computer programs, and language.
·  Students will use mathematical relationships to generate solutions and make connections and predictions.
·  Students will analyze mathematical relationships to connect and communicate mathematical ideas.
·  Students will display, explain, or justify mathematical ideas and arguments using precise mathematical language in written or oral communication.
Learning Standards / Instruction / Resources / Math Stations / Assessment
1.3A
use concrete and pictorial models to determine the sum of a multiple of 10 and a one-digit number in problems up to 99.
.
1.1B
use a problem-solving model that incorporates analyzing given information, formulating a plan or strategy, determining a solution, justifying the solution, and evaluating the problem-solving process and the reasonableness of the solution.
1.3B
use objects and pictorial models to solve word problems involving joining, separating, and comparing sets within 20 and unknowns as any one of the terms in the problem such as 2 + 4 = [ ]; 3 + [ ] = 7; and 5 = [ ] - 3.
1.1C
select tools, including real objects, manipulatives, paper and pencil, and technology as appropriate, and techniques, including mental math, estimation, and number sense as appropriate, to solve problems. / On the first day of October, dismantle the September calendar. Respond to various directions for removing numbers from a calendar; for example, remove the number before 10, the number that is 5 and 3 more, all the sundays, etc.
·  The daily routine consists of Calendar, counting, addition-subtraction, patterns, problem solving, Learning Tubs (Math Stations), small group instruction with the teacher, Vocabulary and journal reflection/writing,
·  Calendar – Refer to 1st week routines
·  Counting to 50 on the number line or alternate one day on the number line and then on the 100 chart.

Refer to week 2 for more details related to 100 chart.
·  Continue to provide practice - Compose and Decompose the numbers 1 – 10 using the Ten Frame mat.
·  Number Pattern
2 4 6 8 10 ____
What will come next in the pattern?
How do you know?
·  Problem of the Day – Teacher Resource Masters (use Read and Understand, Plan, Solve, and Look Back and Check).
·  Introduce Concept and Vocabulary
·  Stations
o  Teacher – Small Group
o  Students in learning stations
·  VocabularyRoutine – Frayer Model (The recommended word/words for Frayer Model is in bold letters in the key vocabulary)
o  Monday – Introduce the word and place word in the middle
o  Monday and Tuesday – Provide opportunities to experience the word, use word in context, read books, use manipulatives
o  Wednesday – Have students provide the definition and characteristics. Write on Frayer Model
o  Thursday – Have students provide examples (synonyms) and non-examples (antonyms).
·  Journal reflection
Key Vocabulary:
Topic 3: part, whole, add, plus (+), sum, equals (=), addition sentence, join, order, addend
Addition: Sums to 10
§  Use concrete objects to model addition problem situations with sums to 10 and write the corresponding number sentence.
Use tools such as the Part/Part/Whole mat and concrete objects such as counters to model addition problem situations.
Part / Part
Whole
Example:
Payton had 2 teddy bears, her sister gave her 3 more. How many teddy bears does Payton have all together?
Model by placing 2 teddy-bear counters in one “part” of the Part/Part/Whole mat and 3 teddy bears counters in the other “part” of the Part/Part/Whole mat.
/
Move the “parts” to the whole section since the question asks to find the number of teddy bears she has all together.

Remind the students that Payton started with 2 bears and her sister gave her 3 bears. She ended up with a total of 5 bears.
Model for the students how to write the number sentence.
Number Sentence: 2+3=5 or 3+2=5.
§  Use concrete objects to create addition problem situations with sums to 10 and write the corresponding number sentence.
Use tools such as a Part/Part/Whole mat and concrete objects such as counters to create addition problem situations.
Part / Part
Whole
Example:
Provide the students with 10 two- colored counters. Prompt the students to use the 10 two-colored counters to create an addition problem situation and write the corresponding number sentence.
Example of an addition problem: “Makenzie had 6 pencils, and her friend gave her 4 more. How many pencils does Makenzie have in all?”
Possible Answer:
The students place 6 two-colored counters in one “part” of the Part/Part/Whole mat and 4 two-colored counters in the other “part” of the Part/Part/Whole mat.

/
Since the question asks to find the number of pencils she had in all, the students will then move the “parts” to the “whole” section.


The students write the number sentence that matches the problem.
Answer: 6 + 4 = 10
Using the Problem Solving Model with Joining and Separating SetsExample:
Kevin had some pieces of bubble gum. His friend gave him 3 more pieces of bubble gum. Now Kevin has a total of 7 pieces of bubble gum. How many pieces of bubble gum did Kevin have to start with?
Read and Understand the Problem:
§  Ask students to restate the problem.
§  Ask, “What are we trying to find out?”
Possible Answer: “Kevin had some gum, but we don’t know how much. His friend gave him 3 more pieces. Now he has 7 pieces of bubble gum.”
Making a Plan:
§  Ask the students, “Are we joining sets or separating sets?”
§  Ask the students, “What is the important information in this problem?”
Possible Answer: “We can find out which number plus 3 is equal to 7 since we know 7 is the total and his friend gave him 3 pieces.”
Solve:
§  Ask the students, “How are you going to solve the problem?”
§  Remind the students that they can draw a picture, act out the problem, look for a pattern, and/or use guess and check.
Possible Answer:
“I am going to get out 7 counters and take out 3 of the counters to represent the pieces of bubble gum that Kevin’s friend gave him. I am going to count what is left and that is what Kevin started with.”
Look Back and Check:
§  Ask the students, “Is it reasonable to get a smaller number than the numbers in the problem if we are joining sets?” Prompt the students to explain their thinking.
§  Ask the students, “Is it reasonable to get a larger number than the numbers in the problem if we are separating sets?” Prompt the students to explain their thinking.
Possible Answer: “I know I did this correctly because 3 + 4 is equal to 7.”
Prompt the students to record in a math journal, notebook, or on a piece of paper their thoughts and explanations of the problems that are modeled. Prompt the students to write (words, pictures, or teacher dictation) an explanation of how they solved the problem.
Example:
/
Kevin’s Friend / 1 2 3 4
Possible Explanation: “I drew 7 circles to show the 7 pieces of bubble gum Kevin had. I put 3 pieces in one box that said, “Kevin’s Friend.” The number of circles left is 4. Kevin had 4 pieces of bubble gum to start with.
I checked my answer by using the addition sentence 3 + 4 = 7.”
Applying Addition Facts: Sums to 10
§  Use concrete models to apply basic addition facts to sums of 10.
Example:
Give the students a problem such as
5 + 4 = ? and prompt the students to use counters to solve the problem.

/

Answer: 5 + 4 = 9
§  Use pictorial models to apply basic addition facts to sums of 10.
Example:

/ /
8 + 2 = 10
/ enVision Math -Topic 3 TE Lessons 3-1 through 3-7.
Literature Connection:
Addition Annie by David Gisler
Ten Frame - Teaching Tool 5 from Teaching Tool Masters Topic 1-20
Part Part Mat – Teaching Tool 3 from Teaching Tool Masters Topic 1-20
Technology: Pearson enVision link for animated introduction – copy and paste this link:
https://www.pearsonsuccessnet.com/
enVision eTools
http://www.fun4thebrain.com/addition.html
http://www.internet4classrooms.com/skills-1st-mathbuilders.htm
http://www.funbrain.com/linejump/index.html
When starting a new concept, students take home the “Home-School Connection” letter to parents from the enVision Math Texas student consumable book. Using the Home-School Connection letters introduces parents/guardians the concept the students are learning and encourages active parental support of mathematics. / Five Frame/Ten Frame – Students will practice composing and decomposing numbers 1 - 10
Domino – Students will practice making number sentences using dominoes or using Domino Sums 1-6 Teaching Tool 13.
Dice – Provide a variety of dice, if available. Allow students to use dice to make number sentences and then create a word problem using those numbers.
Number Line – Students explore the number line and solve addition problems using the number line. Also, you may allow students to use http://www.funbrain.com/linejump/index.html
To practice using the number line

Math Facts: Crack the Mystery Pasta Code

Center Activities Topic 3 – Teacher Resource Masters
Interventions/Extensions
Based on student needs
Each lesson has differentiated instruction activities and homework based on the understanding of the concept by the students. The teacher will use the student work on the Quick Check to prescribe differentiated instruction.
Also…..
Use TE Meeting Individual Needs 49G and 49H to differentiate instruction for ELL, Special Needs, Below Level and Advanced students.
Tier 2 – Students work in small groups or with peer tutors to complete assigned tasks / Formal or informal
Students will be able to recognize and solve problems in addition situations using the five frame, ten frame, number line, or any other tools available
Product/Project
Journal Entry
Various reflections showing learning at Math Stations – Students will illustrate shapes, numbers, colors, sorting rule with which they explored in the various stations.
Students will show a Part Part addition model using own pictures
Students will use magazines/catalogs to cut out various items. Then, students will write out the word problem and addition sentence
Math Concept Board – continue adding to the concept board. Review vocabulary added previously.
Week 2 and 3
October 8 – October 19
9 instructional days
+1 days to complete assessment / Learning Standards
1.1 The student uses mathematical processes to acquire and demonstrate mathematical understanding.
1.2 The student applies mathematical process standards to represent and compare whole numbers
1.3 The student applies mathematical process standards to develop and use strategies for whole number addition and subtraction computations in order to solve problems.
1.5 The student applies mathematical process standards to identify and apply number patterns within properties of numbers and operations in order to describe relationships / Processes
·  When possible, students will apply mathematics to problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace.
·  Students will use a problem-solving model that incorporates analyzing given information, formulating a plan or strategy, determining a solution, justifying the solution, and evaluating the problem-solving process and the reasonableness of the solution.
·  Students will select appropriate tools such as real objects, manipulatives, algorithms, paper and pencil, and technology and techniques such as mental math, estimation, [and] number sense, and generalization and abstraction to solve problems.
·  Students will effectively communicate mathematical ideas, reasoning, and their implications using multiple representations such as symbols, diagrams, graphs, computer programs, and language.
·  Students will use mathematical relationships to generate solutions and make connections and predictions.
·  Students will analyze mathematical relationships to connect and communicate mathematical ideas.
·  Students will display, explain, or justify mathematical ideas and arguments using precise mathematical language in written or oral communication.
Learning Standards / Instruction / Resources / Math Stations / Assessment
.
1.3B
use objects and pictorial models to solve word problems involving joining, separating, and comparing sets within 20 and unknowns as any one of the terms in the problem such as 2 + 4 = [ ]; 3 + [ ] = 7; and 5 = [ ] - 3
1.1B
Use a problem-solving model that incorporates analyzing given information, formulating a plan or strategy, determining a solution, justifying the solution, and evaluating the problem-solving process and the reasonableness of the solution.
1.1D Communicate mathematical ideas, reasoning, and their implications using multiple representations, including symbols, diagrams, graphs, and language as appropriate
1.1C
Select tools, including real objects, manipulatives, paper and pencil, and technology as appropriate, and techniques, including mental math, estimation, and number sense as appropriate, to solve problems / By this time, classroom routines and norms have been established. It is very important to keep students accountable to these routines. If necessary, review procedures and expectations of how to work collaboratively.
Teach students the daily routine. The daily routine consists of Calendar, counting, addition-subtraction, patterns, problem solving, Learning Tubs (Math Stations), small group instruction with the teacher, Vocabulary and journal reflection/writing,